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Health Alert
Joe McMinamen
Friday, September 20, 2019

********Health Alert*************

 

There has been a confirmed case of Mono in one of our High School Students.  We have also had a couple of (+) Strep in both the Elementary and High School.

 

Mono

Infectious mononucleosis, also called “mono,” is a contagious disease. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the most common cause of infectious mononucleosis, but other viruses can also cause this disease. It is common among teenagers and young adults, especially college students. At least one out of four teenagers and young adults who get infected with EBV will develop infectious mononucleosis.

Typical symptoms of infectious mononucleosis usually appear four to six weeks after you get infected with EBV. Symptoms may develop slowly and may not all occur at the same time.

These symptoms include:

  • extreme fatigue
  • fever
  • sore throat
  • head and body aches
  • swollen lymph nodes in the neck and armpits
  • swollen liver or spleen or both
  • rash

Typically, these viruses spread most commonly through bodily fluids, especially saliva. However, these viruses can also spread through blood and semen during sexual contact, blood transfusions, and organ transplantations. Good Handwashing is key to help stop the spread of germs including Mono.  No kissing, sharing utensils, lip gloss, drinks or any other items that you might share someone’s saliva. You can go back to school when your health care provider says it's okay. This is usually when you feel much better, which may take a few days to a few weeks. However, you'll probably still feel tired for a while.

To read more on this virus visit https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mononucleosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20350328.             

Strep

 

Strep throat is a bacterial infection caused by group A Streptococcus or “group A strep.” In addition to a sore throat, symptoms can include pain when swallowing, a fever, red and swollen tonsils, tiny red spots on the roof of the mouth, or swollen lymph nodes in the front of the neck.

Group A strep bacteria spread through contact with droplets from an infected person’s cough or sneeze. If you touch your mouth, nose, or eyes after touching something that has these droplets on it, you may become ill.

People with strep throat should stay home from work, school, or daycare until they no longer have a fever and have taken antibiotics for at least 24 hours.